The life with a big vs. the life with a small dog

Chuck and Pico are best friends. They play together, run across fields and meadows and then cuddle up exhausted but happy together in the dog basket. The two males simply understand each other blindly. What they don't understand at all, however, are the reactions of the many people they meet while walking together. Most of them make big eyes, suddenly start to laugh loudly or look a little worried out of the laundry. One thing is clear, the two unequal four-legged friends attract a lot of attention. Because there is a weight difference of exactly 55.8 kilograms between Chihuahua Pico and the Great Swiss Mountain Dog Chuck! No problem for the animal mates. While the two enjoy their similarities rather than paying attention to unimportant external differences, their two mistresses can spend hours philosophizing about how different life with a big dog and life with a small one is. We at William Walker have summarized some interesting contrasts between big and small for you today.

Life with a big dog is more expensive than life with a small

The giants on four paws need clearly more food than its small Artgenossen. While Pico is sufficiently supplied daily with 50-60 grams of his dry food, Chuck eats almost 600 grams of the same food. This is a considerable amount, which can also be felt in his wallet. Usually larger dog items, such as bowls, baskets, collars and leashes are also a bit more expensive, because simply more material is used. In the other areas of animal life, however, this cost difference is not so serious. Because with the veterinary surgeon or dog trainer it does not play a role whether large or small four-legged friend, the expenditure remains the same. Of course, the costs also vary according to the demands of the owner: While Pico is equipped with all stylish William Walker beds, blankets, collars and care products, Chuck wears his beloved Paracord Hanseatic collar. Fur and paws it cleans completely oldschool by tongue. This way, costs can be saved in many places, whether in accessories or in the way of feeding, or they can be driven up - and that in all weight classes.

Small dogs do not have to be educated so consistently

Of course all dogs, whether large, small, thin or fat, should have enjoyed a consistent basic education. In addition, the various educational measures, extra commands and targeted behavioral training must always be adapted to the nature of the dog and his physique. If small dogs behave badly, this usually has no further consequences. A large dog that behaves in a high-spirited, frightened, aggressive or in any way conspicuous can cause far more devastating damage. Therefore, one may approach the education of a small dog a little more relaxed and lean back now and then. Pico likes to pull on the leash when it comes to pleasing a dog lady. The 2.2 kilograms of body mass are then tensed up properly and the tail sticks up elegantly. No problem for his mistress, she can simply go on with minimal pulling on the leash and put an end to Pico's peccadillo. Fortunately Chuck is not interested in the female sex at all. Only one thing counts for him: The pack must stay together! When this was not the case, Chuck panicked and caught up with the escaped biped as quickly as possible. Only when he came to a halt did he realize that he had dragged his mistress through the mud hanging almost 10 meters from the line. Since then, line training has always been the top priority on Chuck's exercise schedule.

A bodyguard on four paws

Most dogs, whether large or small, have a sense of when a situation is dangerous or unpleasant. In some moments, our animal companions even seem to have a better knowledge of human nature than their owners. Herding dogs are usually large and strong. They are considered the best guardians in the dog kingdom. When Chuck trots across the forest floor, it sounds as if a herd of bison is on the move. Equally impressive is the sound of his bass-like, loud belle - guaranteed to put any burglar to flight. Pico barks much more often, but sounds more like an angry budgie. The price for the best bodyguard goes clearly to the big dog breeds.

Small dogs live longer and healthier

Very sad, but true. The life expectancy of large dog breeds, like Molossers and Co. is about 7 - 9 years. A much too short life for man's best friend. Pico is with his 6 dog years still in the bloom of his life, because Chihuahuas can become well up to 20 years old. As much as Chuck loves to play with his little buddy - he needs much more breaks and his mistress has to intervene when things get too wild. Chuck is 7 years old and already has arthritis in his hips and shoulders. A few years ago he barely survived a stomach twist. Whether it is the stomach, spleen or any other organ in the abdominal cavity, large breeds of dogs have an increased risk of organ rotation, the nightmare of every dog owner. Only a few large four-legged friends are also spared joint problems. Small dogs, on the other hand, usually have much better health, intact joints and fewer allergies. A good place to sleep can increase your dog's wellbeing and help fight osteoarthritis and the like. What you should pay attention to when choosing a place to sleep for your dog, you will find out here. When feeding your four-legged friend you should always keep an eye on his figure. The golden rule says: Better a little too thin than a little too thick. This way, we humans can at least have a little influence on the health of our faithful companion - but most importantly, it is to enjoy every second together.

Whether big, small, thick, thin, light, dark, plain or spotted - dogs don't care about these differences. Only we humans find different attributes in dogs appealing, beautiful or funny. First and foremost it is much more important for dogs whether they can smell good. Chuck and Pico can definitely do that and live out their bromance to the full despite all physical contrasts.

Can you think of any differences in living together with a big or a small dog or do you have such an unequal couple at home? We are looking forward to your comments.

 

By Louisa Knoll

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